asylum-art:

Rotating Glass Sculpture By Thomas Medicus

‘Emulsifier’ is a rotating glass sculpture by Thomas Medicus. This beautiful and interesting work is made up of four hand-painted anamorphic paintings on 160 glass strips. Check out the video to learn more about it!

via ignant

Watch the video:

asylum-art:

At Joshua Liner Gallery, New Works from Tiffany Bozic.

For this work, Bozic remembers a trip to Mount Lassen, California, with her husband. Recalling the experience—even though several years had passed—Bozic finally sat down to create this painting, remembering her imagination of “deep sea organisms slowly drifting up into the sky from the black current of the water.” She also notes, “I suppose the image stuck with me because it could be a metaphor for a lot of my different emotions… some light and warm, some deep and cold.” The contrasting tones and shades lend themselves to this mood, with negative dark space and dark trees emerging from the solid white snow forms. The ethereal sea shapes preside over the scene.

In an attempt to relay her consciousness’ perspective, this body of work is a rich account of Tiffany Bozic’s incredible encounters with nature. Bozic describes the source of her inspiration as a “complex and inexplicable world.” However, with Qualia, Bozic’s world is within reach and beautifully discrete.

saaafffy:

endlesswanderluster:

mollymimieux:

Imagine that one day the whole world would look like this.

Nature conquers

Heaven. 

(Source: boredpanda.com)

asylum-art:

Aerial - Joseph Ford

facebook | twitter

On a trip to Sicily, Mauritius and Morocco photographer Joseph Ford spent several days flying around over all sorts of terrain in a helicopter. After showing the aerial pictures to some friends they suggested shooting a series mixing fashion and landscapes. Juxtaposing clothes and aerial landscape, the piece of work was selected for the Association of Photographers Awards in the UK and had an Honorable Mention in the International Photography Awards.
The combination of images creates a fascinating interaction, highlighting the appeal of each image, which would have been less remarkable on their own. But by identifying an unexpected relationship with other images each picture develops a gripping impression.

fer1972:

Animals Illustrations by Michael McConnell

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Glorious Biology GIFs Visualize The Secrets To Animal Flight

Seattle-based artist and recent University of Washington graduate Eleanor Lutz has decided to spend a year combining her two passions: design and biology. To bring the two seemingly disparate fields together, she started her own infographic design project, a science illustration blog chock full of GIF deconstructions of human and animal behavior. Combining Photoshop, Illustrator, and a Wacom drawing tablet, Lutz has so far completed four installments of her animated infographic series, and shared them on Tabletop Whale, her project blog.

Lutz’s first blog post, entitled “A Visual Compendium of Glowing Creatures”, was published on July 21st of this year. 200 sources and a 468 page textbook later, Lutz’s final product, a poster of bioluminescent organisms, glows with detailed illustrations and biological profiles of each organism. This past month, Lutz followed up her debut with 25 GIF infographic, A User’s Guide to the Human Body: The Muscle Edition, and an animated chart of 42 North American butterflies. It’s a glorious marriage of science and art, and we can’t wait to see what Lutz will illustrate next.

asylum-art:

Photographer Hal: BredaPhoto 2014

A person is only complete when he or she is together with someone else, says the Japanese Photographer Hal (1971). ‘That’s why I pack them together’. He means that literally. For his series Zatsuran he asked couples to step inside a big plastic bag. With a vacuum cleaner he sucked the air out. 


the-bitch-king-0f-angmar:

flowisaconstruct:

davidrainey:

Omfg

These are brilliant.

"Clever Girl"  OMG…….

(Source: iraffiruse)

asylum-art:

asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamotos Incredible Saltscapes

Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.

There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.

Watch the vide:

asylum-art:

Reuben Wu  Photography

Artist on Tumblr | Facebook| on Behance

Both photographer and musician Reuben Wu is an English artist born in Liverpool which offers us photographs of great beauty. With his latest series “Ultima Esperanza”, he reveals stunning scenery tinted with surrealism.